Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Research Questions About Terminating the PSTN

      Incumbent carrier initiatives to eliminate the PSTN and their carrier of last resort responsibilities may constitute on of the key evolving policy initiatives going forward. Here are some research questions worthy of investigation:

If consumers must migrate from POTS to a NGN (IP-centric) replacement, what are the net consequences in terms of consumers’ out of pocket costs, as well as network QOS, availability, reliability and  scalability? 

Can wireless networks accommodate the complete off loading of wireline traffic?  Would this offloading exacerbate spectrum  scarcity?

If incumbents continue to rely on wireline plant, e.g., U-verse, do they gain deregulation without conferring much upside consumer benefits?   For example most carriers offer unmetered (All You Can Eat") wireline service  at about $20 a month, but metered wireless service costs 2 or 3 times as much.
 
How would deregulation create incentives for carriers to migrate from copper to fiber media?
As many incumbents have eschewed POTS universal service funding, will they similarly avoid broadband subsidies tied to open network access requirements?
Will the migration remedy the digital divide, including areas with limited or no wireless service?

2 comments:

Ben Cramer said...

Re: this post and the related post from Nov. 15... For an opposing viewpoint with which you will probably disagree, see the peer-reviewed article by AT&T's Richard Clarke that we recently published at Journal of Information Policy.

Ben Cramer said...

re: This post and the related post from Nov. 15... For an opposing viewpoint with which you will probably disagree, see the peer-reviewed article by AT&T's Richard Clarke that we recently published at Journal of Information Policy.